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A U.S. congressional delegation has met Taiwan鈥檚 new leader in a show of support shortly after China held drills around the self-governing island in response to his inauguration speech. Rep. Andy Barr, the co-chair of the Taiwan caucus in Congress, said Monday in the capital, Taipei, the United States is fully committed to supporting Taiwan militarily, diplomatically and economically. Taiwan鈥檚 new foreign minister, Lin Chia-lung, noted the recent Chinese drills and called the American delegation鈥檚 visit 鈥渁n important gesture of solidarity鈥 at a critical time. The delegation was led by Rep. Michael McCaul, the chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, who was sanctioned by China last year for visiting Taiwan.

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Former 鈥淕eneral Hospital鈥 actor Johnny Wactor was shot and killed when he interrupted thieves stealing the catalytic converter from his car in Los Angeles. Police say the shooting occurred around 3 a.m. Saturday when the victim approached three men in downtown LA. His mother, Scarlett Wactor, tells ABC 7 that her 37-year-old son had left work at a rooftop bar with a coworker when he saw someone at his car and thought it was being towed. Scarlett Wactor says a mask-wearing suspect looked up and opened fire. Police say three suspects drove away from the scene. Wactor was rushed to a hospital, where he died.

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Authorities say a 61-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of shooting and wounding five people at a Los Angeles area home and then firing at a police helicopter. Police say responding officers found four gunshot victims at the residence in San Fernando on Saturday. A fifth victim was later found at a hospital, where he had driven himself. Authorities say the suspect locked himself in the home and shot at a Los Angeles Police Department helicopter before being taken into custody. No other injuries were reported. More details weren't immediately released about the victims鈥 conditions or what led to the gunfire.

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An evangelical seminary in Pasadena, California, is considering revisions to its sexual standards. According to a draft of those changes obtained by The Associated Press, these changes could mean more freedom for LGBTQ+ students at Fuller Theological Seminary. The seminary's president formed a task force to look into the college's sexual standards after a senior administrator was fired in January for refusing sign the unrevised document. Two students filed lawsuits in 2019 and 2020 after they were expelled for being in same-sex marriages. A spokesperson for the seminary has said no solid proposal has come before the board for a vote and that the revisions are still being discussed.

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The Memorial Day box office is cruising for a two-decade low. 鈥淔uriosa,鈥 the Mad Max prequel starring Anya Taylor-Joy and Chris Hemsworth, claimed the first place spot for Friday-Saturday-Sunday with $25.6 million. That is according to studio estimates on Sunday. Warner Bros. is waiting until Monday to release its four-day estimates. That left room for the weekend's other new opener, 鈥淭he Garfield Movie,鈥 to claim No. 1 for the four-day holiday weekend with $31.9 million. Aside from Memorial Day in 2020 when theaters were closed due to COVID-19, these are the lowest-earning No. 1 movies on this weekend in 29 years.

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Protesters have briefly disrupted an outdoor commencement address given by Brown University鈥檚 president. Shortly after Christina Paxson kicked off the ceremony, her speech on Sunday was interrupted for several minutes by shouting. She eventually resumed, with some people continuing to shout. A group called Brown Alumni for Palestine says that it led the disruption at the ceremony, where Paxson and the Brown Corporation conferred diplomas on the graduating class. The group says it represents over 2,000 alumni who have pledged to withhold donations to Brown until the Corporation divests from companies contributing or profiting from the war in Gaza. Another group, the Rhode Island Coalition for Israel, said it also organized a protest outside the ceremony.

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Richard M. Sherman, one half of the prolific, award-winning pair of brothers who helped form millions of childhoods by penning classic Disney tunes, has died. He was 95. Sherman, along with his late brother Robert, wrote hundreds of songs together, including songs for 鈥淢ary Poppins,鈥 鈥淭he Jungle Book鈥 and 鈥淐hitty Chitty Bang Bang鈥 鈥 as well as the most-played tune on Earth, 鈥淚t鈥檚 a Small World (After All).鈥 The Walt Disney Co. announced that Sherman died Saturday due to age-related illness. The brothers won two Academy Awards for Walt Disney鈥檚 1964 smash 鈥淢ary Poppins.鈥 Robert Sherman died in London in 2012.

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Southern California authorities say a teenager has been arrested on suspicion of attempted carjacking and felony vandalism this week. Police say the 15-year-old male was among a mob of young people who swarmed a sheriff deputy's patrol car earlier this month in Highland. Video footage shows an unruly crowd pounding on the deputy鈥檚 window and kicking the vehicle. The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said the arrested teen opened the driver's door and tried to overtake the car. The deputy was able to close the door and drive away. The young people had gathered at an intersection in Highland, California, for an illegal street takeover.

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Prosecutors in New York have accused Harvey Weinstein鈥檚 lead defense lawyer of making public statements intended to intimidate a potential witness ahead of the fallen movie mogul鈥檚 retrial and have asked a judge to take action. New York鈥檚 highest court last month threw out Weinstein鈥檚 2020 rape conviction. The Manhattan district attorney鈥檚 office sent a letter to the trial judge Thursday criticizing comments made by Weinstein鈥檚 lawyer outside of court on May 1. They want a judge to remind lawyers not to disparage potential witnesses.

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Experts say planning before a tornado threatens is key for staying safe. Weather radios, basements and bicycle helmets can all help save lives. Rick Smith of the National Weather Service says a weather radio is something that every home and business should have. There are also other ways of getting warnings, such as a cellphone app. Experts say having multiple, redundant warning methods is important. Smith advises people to seek shelter underground if possible. And recent research shows that closing your exterior and interior doors can be a good strategy to alleviate the high winds somewhat 鈥 the opposite of the commonly held misconception that you're supposed to open things up equalize the air pressure.

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A first-ever theater show to explore the lives of Asian American Jews tells 14 stories of people ranging in age from 12 to 75. This production is titled 鈥淲hat Do I Do with All This Heritage?鈥 It's a collaboration between The Braid, a story company that highlights the Jewish experience, and The LUNAR Collective, the only national organization for Asian American Jews. The show runs through June 9 in Los Angeles, San Francisco and via Zoom. Its producers say it will take audiences into the unique struggles, dilemmas and joys of people holding these multiple identities.

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Navajo officials are celebrating the signing of legislation outlining a proposed water rights settlement that will ensure supply from the Colorado River and other sources for three Native American tribes and more security for drought-stricken Arizona. Navajo President Buu Nygren was flanked by the tribe's attorney general and council delegates as he signed the legislation Friday in Window Rock, Arizona. Now, the Navajos 鈥 along with the San Juan Southern Paiute and Hopi tribes 鈥 will be working to get Congress' approval. The Navajos have one of the largest single outstanding claims in the Colorado River basin and officials say the needs across the territory exceed the proposed price tag of $5 billion.

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The Beach Boys are looking back on a life of sunshine and sorrow in a new Disney+ documentary. Titled just 鈥淭he Beach Boys,鈥 director Frank Marshall tried to capture the widest range of voices to tell their six-decade story as thoroughly as possible. Marshall had wanted to tell the story for years, but couldn't do it until his friend, the businessman Irving Azoff, bought the long-disputed rights to their songs and made it possible to use them. The documentary acknowledges that Beach Boys' singer Mike Love co-wrote many of the group's most popular songs, including 鈥淕ood Vibrations," with band mastermind Brian Wilson.

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Authorities say Sean Kingston and his mother committed more than a million dollars in fraud in recent months, stealing money, jewelry, a Cadillac Escalade and furniture. Arrest warrants released Friday say the 34-year-old Kingston and his 61-year-old mother, Janice Turner, have been charged in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with conducting an organized scheme to defraud, grand theft and related crimes. The two were arrested Thursday after a SWAT team raided Kingston鈥檚 rented mansion in suburban Fort Lauderdale. Kingston had a No. 1 hit with 鈥淏eautiful Girls鈥 in 2007 and performed with Justin Bieber on the song 鈥淓enie Meenie.鈥 An attorney representing Kingston and his mother says they 鈥渁re confident of a successful resolution.鈥

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Nineteen Republican state attorneys general have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to get involved in a dispute over climate-change lawsuits. The Republican attorneys general want the high court to block lawsuits filed by five Democratic-led states seeking damages from oil companies for their role in contributing to climate change. The GOP request targets lawsuits filed in state courts in California, Connecticut, Minnesota, New Jersey and Rhode Island. Those states are just a few of the dozens of state and local governments that have filed climate change lawsuits against the oil industry in recent years.

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An 18-year-old man has been arrested for allegedly taking part in a violent attack on a pro-Palestinian encampment at the University of California, Los Angeles, last month. UCLA police say the man was detained in Beverly Hills on Thursday morning and was booked at the UCLA Police Department for felony assault with a deadly weapon. The department says he is not a UCLA student, faculty or staff member. UCLA did not identify the man, but online county jail records show that 18-year-old Edan On was arrested by UCLA police Thursday morning and was jailed on $30,000 bail. Last week, CNN reported that its review of the attack identified On as a young man seen using a pole to strike a pro-Palestinian demonstrator.

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Rapper Sean Kingston has been arrested in California on fraud charges after a SWAT team raided his rented South Florida mansion and arrested his mother. The Broward County sheriff's office arrested 61-year-old Janice Turner during Thursday's raid. Kingston was not present. The 34-year-old artist said via Instagram that his attorneys were dealing with authorities. A lawyer for a home entertainment company said the arrests stem partly from Kingston failing to pay for a $150,000 television system. He allegedly told the company that if they gave him a discount, he would make commercials for them. The company says he never paid or did ads.

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The Navajo Nation Council has unanimously approved a proposed water rights settlement that carries a price tag larger than any such agreement enacted by Congress. The tribe has one of the largest single outstanding claims in the Colorado River basin, and Thursday's vote marks one of many approvals needed to finalize a deal that has been years in the making. Aside from ensuring water deliveries for the Navajo, Hopi and San Juan Southern Paiute tribes, the settlement provides some certainty over the Colorado River supply in a state that has been forced to cut back on water use.

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Researchers climbed the world鈥檚 largest tree to inspect for bark beetles and descended the giant sequoia with good news this week. Anthony Ambrose of the Ancient Forest Society led the team up the 275-foot tree called General Sherman. He said researchers found minimal beetle activity in the 2,200-year-old tree in California's western Sierra Nevada range. The inspection was part of a broader effort to protect sequoias from climate-driven threats including extreme heat, drought and wildfires. The Giant Sequoia Lands Coalition organized Tuesday's climb. The group also tested the use of drones and satellite imagery for wider monitoring of the iconic trees for any beetle infestations and other threats.

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Arizona doctors can temporarily come to California to perform abortions for their patients under a new law signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom. California鈥檚 law is meant to circumvent an Arizona law first passed in 1864 that bans nearly all abortions in that state. The Arizona Supreme Court recently reinstated the near-total abortion ban but agreed to hold off on its enforcement until the fall. The Arizona Legislature quickly repealed it, but that action likely won't go into effect until late summer or fall. Given the uncertainty, Democrats in California said they wanted to help Arizona patients seeking abortions.

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Protesters packed up and left a pro-Palestinian encampment at Philadelphia鈥檚 Drexel University after the school announced a decision to have police clear the encampment. University President John Fry said in a statement that the school is committed to protecting the community members鈥 right to assemble peacefully and express their views, but he has the responsibility and authority to regulate campus gatherings. News outlets reported that police gave protesters a warning early Thursday to clear the encampment and protesters left. Protest organizers say in a statement posted online that they 鈥渟ucceeded in our aim to disrupt鈥 and they have vowed to stay active.

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A containment boom has been placed around a former cruise ship that began sinking and leaking pollution in California鈥檚 Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The 294-foot ship known as the Aurora MV is permanently moored in a slough northwest of the city of Stockton. The U.S. Coast Guard says it began to sink in 13 feet of water Wednesday. A sheen was observed on the water, and a wildlife care organization was notified. There were no immediate sightings of any oiled wildlife. The ship was built in Germany in the 1950s and operated as a cruise ship named the Wappen von Hamburg.

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A leading Black Lives Matter activist in Los Angeles has lost her lawsuit against the city鈥檚 police department over its handling of hoax calls that brought a large law enforcement response to her home. Police have said three teenagers driven by racial hatred were behind so-called 鈥渟watting鈥 calls across the country, including two in 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles home of Melina Abdullah, co-founder of BLM-LA and a Cal State LA professor. Abdullah, a prominent police critic, sued the the department for its actions, saying that she said left her and her three children fearing for their lives. 聽A jury found the LAPD and the city were not liable.

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Train bassist and founding member Charlie Colin has died at 58. Colin鈥檚 sister confirmed the musician's death Wednesday to The Associated Press. Variety reported Colin slipped and fell in the shower while house-sitting for a friend in Brussels. Train formed in San Francisco in the early 鈥90s. Colin played on Train's first three records, 1998鈥檚 self-titled album, 2001鈥檚 鈥淒rops of Jupiter鈥 and 2003鈥檚 鈥淢y Private Nation.鈥 The track 鈥淒rops of Jupiter (Tell Me)鈥 hit No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also earned two Grammys. Colin left the band in 2003. He also worked with the Newport Beach Film Festival.

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Nearly half of Americans over 65 will pay for some version of long-term health care, the landscape of which is quickly transitioning away from nursing homes and toward community living situations. An analysis by The Associated Press with the help of CNHI News finds Black Americans are less likely to use residential care communities and more likely to live in nursing homes. The opposite is true for white Americans. Experts say the reasons behind the disparity are complicated 鈥 like personal and cultural preferences and financial considerations.

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Congo鈥檚 army spokesman has released the name of the third American involved a foiled coup plot in Kinshasa. Brig. Gen. Sylvain Ekenge told The Associated Press the third American was Taylor Thomson, but his family identified him as Tyler Thompson. It wasn鈥檛 immediately clear whether Thompson was among those arrested or killed on Sunday morning following the attack on the palace and another on the residence of a close ally of President Felix Tshisekedi. The leader of the plot, Christian Malanga, was killed in a shootout at the palace after resisting arrest. The other two confirmed Americans involved were a convicted marijuana trafficker and Malanga鈥檚 21-year-old son, Marcel.

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The police chief at the University of California, Los Angeles, has been reassigned amid criticism of his handling of campus demonstrations. Violence ensued when a mob attacked a pro-Palestinian encampment. UCLA vice chancellor for communications Mary Osako says John Thomas was temporarily reassigned Tuesday pending an examination of security processes. The move follows UCLA鈥檚 May 5 announcement of the creation of a new chief safety officer position to oversee campus security. Thomas told the Los Angeles Times this month that he did everything he could to provide security and keep students safe during days of strife that left UCLA shaken.

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The New York state Senate has passed a bill to explicitly allow evidence of prior sexual offenses in sex crimes cases. It's a move to change the legal standard Harvey Weinstein used to overturn his rape conviction. The Senate on Wednesday approved the proposal, sending the bill to the state Assembly. Lawmakers began pushing the measure weeks after the state鈥檚 high court tossed Weinstein鈥檚 conviction in a ruling that found a trial judge wrongly allowed women to testify about assault allegations that weren鈥檛 part of his criminal charges. The state does allow such evidence in limited instances but the rules are determined by legal precedent, not state law.

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The federal Bureau of Prisons will go to trial next year over claims it allowed an environment where guards at a now-shuttered California prison abused incarcerated women. In the first public hearing since FCI Dublin closed last month, the judge on Wednesday also ordered a special master she appointed in March to continue to handle the cases of some 600 women transferred out of the prison. Many of the inmates sent to other federal lockups claimed they suffered mistreatment during the transfer process. The judge scheduled a case management conference for Sept. 9 and ordered both sides to be ready for trial on June 23, 2025.

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Hunter Biden is scheduled to stand trial on federal tax charges in September after a judge granted his request to delay the trial that had been approaching next month. President Joe Biden鈥檚 son is still scheduled to stand trial beginning June 3 on federal gun charges in a Delaware case. Hunter Biden has pleaded not guilty to both indictments, which his lawyers claim are politically motivated. Prosecutors opposed the delay request in the tax case, saying Hunter Biden 鈥渋s not above the rule of law and should be treated like any other defendant.鈥 Both cases are overseen by judges nominated by then-President Donald Trump, a Republican seeking to unseat the Democratic president.

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Climate climate change increasingly threatens research laboratories, weapons sites and power plants across the nation that handle or are contaminated with radioactive material or perform critical energy and defense research. The Department of Energy recently required existing sites to assess vulnerability to fires, floods and other disasters. Now the agency division that oversees active sites will decide how to consider future climate risks when issuing permits or licenses. The General Accounting Office is urging the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to do the same for nuclear power plants.

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Many high school students in the United States are sensitive to the ongoing climate crisis, and some are demanding more paths that allow them to work on solutions to the planet's warming. Colleges and universities are responding. Some have rebranded traditional sustainability and environmental science tracks as climate programs or degrees, while others are introducing and marketing climate centers and certificates to attract a wave of climate-minded students. In these programs, students learn how the atmosphere is changing as a result of burning coal, oil and gas. They also learn the way crops will shift with the warming planet and the role of renewable energy in cutting use of fossil fuels.

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Climate climate change increasingly threatens research laboratories, weapons sites and power plants across the nation that handle or are contaminated with radioactive material or perform critical energy and defense research. The Department of Energy recently required existing sites to assess vulnerability to fires, floods and other disasters. Now the agency division that oversees active sites will decide how to consider future climate risks when issuing permits or licenses. The General Accounting Office is urging the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to do the same for nuclear power plants.

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The number of people of both Latino and Asian American or Pacific Islander heritage has more than doubled in the last 20 years yet it remains an often ignored demographic, according to a new analysis. Researchers at UCLA Latino Policy and Politics Institute said Wednesday their analysis indicates people in the United States who identify as Latino and Asian American or Pacific Islander, or "AAPI Latinos,鈥 rose from 350,000 to 886,000 between 2000 and 2022. This included the 2000 census count as well as American Community Survey 5-year estimates on population characteristics from 2010 and 2022. Some AAPI Latinos say they now embrace being of two cultures.

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A federal judge has dismissed the felony convictions of five retired military officers who had admitted to accepting bribes from a Malaysian contractor nicknamed 鈥淔at Leonard鈥 in one of the Navy鈥檚 biggest corruption cases. The dismissals came at the request of the government 鈥 not the defense 鈥 citing prosecutorial errors. Four of them pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of disclosing information on Tuesday, while U.S. Navy officer Stephen Shedd's entire case was thrown out. Their defense lawyers could not be immediately reached for comment.

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An investigation has been opened into the death of Matthew Perry and how the 鈥淔riends鈥 actor received the anesthetic ketamine, which was ruled contributing factor in his death. Los Angeles Police Capt. Scot Williams says Tuesday that the police department was working with the Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service with a probe into why the 54-year-old star had so much ketamine in his system when he died in October. Perry was found unresponsive in the hot tub of his Los Angeles home. His autopsy released in December found that the amount of ketamine in Perry鈥檚 blood was in the range used for general anesthesia during surgery.

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A chance for parole has been delayed for a former Los Angeles police detective serving a sentence of 27 years to life in the cold-case slaying of her ex-boyfriend鈥檚 wife in 1986. Stephanie Lazarus was convicted in 2012 of killing Sherri Rasmussen, a nurse who was bludgeoned and shot to death in the condo she shared with her husband of three months, John Ruetten. The case hinged on DNA from a bite mark that prosecutors say Lazarus left on Rasmussen鈥檚 arm. Officials determined in November that Lazarus was eligible for parole. The parole board on Monday referred the case to a lower panel to consider whether to rescind the earlier recommendation.

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Fred Roos, the Oscar-winning producer of 鈥淭he Godfather Part II鈥 who helped launch the careers of numerous superstars from Jack Nicholson to Tom Cruise, has died. He was 89. His representative says Roos died at his home in Beverly Hills, California, on Saturday, just days after his and Francis Ford Coppola鈥檚 latest film 鈥淢egalopolis鈥 premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. Roos and Coppola worked together for over 50 years starting with 鈥淭he Godfather鈥 and including best picture nominees 鈥淭he Conversation鈥 and 鈥淎pocalypse Now.鈥 The stories about his impact on some of the biggest films of all time, including 鈥淪tar Wars,鈥 are the stuff of Hollywood legend.

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A month before Kevin Costner puts the first installment of his multi-chapter Western 鈥淗orizon: An American Saga鈥 into theaters, the actor-director came to the Cannes Film Festival to unveil his self-financed passion project. The movie is actually two, or if Costner has his way, four. 鈥淗orizon: Chapter One,鈥 which runs three hours, will be released by Warner Bros. in theaters June 28. 鈥淐hapter Two鈥 follows August 16. Costner has scripts ready for parts three and four. It鈥檚 also Costner鈥檚 biggest gamble, ever. To raise the money for the $100 million-plus production, he mortgaged his seaside Santa Barbara, California, estate.

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Authorities in Congo are accusing three Americans of involvement in a brazen weekend attack on Congo鈥檚 presidential palace. According to the official description of events, the three formed an unlikely band under the leadership of eccentric opposition figure Christian Malanga, who dabbled in gold mining and used cars before persuading his Utah-born son to join in the ill-fated coup attempt. Six people, including Malanga, were killed in the attack early Sunday and the three Americans were among dozens arrested. Officials say they are trying to untangle how Malanga鈥檚 21-year-old son, Marcel, went from playing high school football to allegedly trying to unseat the leader of one of Africa鈥檚 largest countries. Marcel's mother says, 鈥淢y son is innocent.鈥

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Graduate students at the University of California, Santa Cruz walked off their jobs and went on strike Monday. Academic workers at UC Santa Cruz are the first to do so as part of a systemwide protest against a public university they say has violated the speech rights of pro-Palestinian advocates. United Auto Workers Local 4811 represents 48,000 graduate students who work as teaching assistants, tutors and researchers across the system's 10 campuses. UC officials say the work stoppages violate the bargaining agreement. Both sides have filed unfair labor practice complaints with a state labor board.

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A federal judge will reopen the sentencing hearing for the man who broke into Nancy Pelosi鈥檚 San Francisco home and bludgeoned her husband with a hammer after the judge failed to allow him to speak during his court appearance last week. District Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley said in a court filing that it was a 鈥渃lear error鈥 on her part not to allow David DePape a chance to make a statement during his Friday sentencing. He was sentenced to 30 years for the attack on Paul Pelosi and 20 years for attempting to kidnap Nancy Pelosi. The judge scheduled a new hearing for May 28.

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A lawsuit has been filed over California鈥檚 decision to take over monitoring groundwater use in part of the fertile San Joaquin Valley under a landmark law aimed at protecting the vital resource. The Kings County Farm Bureau and two landowners filed a lawsuit last week over a decision by the State Water Resources Control Board in April to place the Tulare Lake Subbasin on so-called probationary status. The move placed state officials in charge of tracking how much water is pumped from the ground in the region. The lawsuit says the state is going beyond its authority. A message was left for the state board.

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A California congressman says tribes should be more involved in the decision-making process for the development of the first offshore wind farms along the West Coast. U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman, who represents California's north coast, sent a letter to federal regulators requesting that they place a senior official in the state to specifically respond to tribal needs. The Bureau of Ocean Management says it has engaged with tribes in the region. But tribal communities in California and Oregon have expressed frustration with what they describe as a lack of consultation on proposals that impact culturally significant waters and land.

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Officials say a Los Angeles police officer was injured when she was ejected from her patrol vehicle after it was stolen by a man who then crashed it. The police department says the unnamed officer had been working a security detail near downtown around 3:30 a.m. Sunday when a man approached her SUV and managed to get inside. The man drove several blocks before crashing. The suspect was apprehended as he tried to run away from the scene. The officer was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries and listed in stable condition.